Go Back   WAHM Forums - WAHM.com > >

Welcome to the WAHM Forums - WAHM.com.

Welcome to WAHM Forums

Already registered? Login above 

OR

To take advantage of all the site's features, become a member of the largest community of Work-At-Home Moms.

The advertising to the left will not show if you are a registered user.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-15-2013, 07:48 PM
NYoung's Avatar
Super WAHM
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 201
Default Revisions revisions revisions

Need to vent:
I'm on my fourth round of revisions for this one piece. Now, it sounds nothing like what I had originally written. They find new things to change eveytime they read the 500 word article..

You'd think by the 2nd or 3rd round of revisionns, all issues would have been addressed. My 25$ article has now taken me many hours (around 5)! It seems some people should write their own content if they are so particular about how it is worded.

/end rant
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-15-2013, 08:54 PM
Registered WAHM
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 12
Default

One of my first articles for an online client was like that. I think it finally ended with like 8 revisions. It was easy stuff that he could have fixed later on if he wanted a certain word instead.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2013, 01:49 AM
dsmpublishing's Avatar
Awesome WAHM
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Portugal
Posts: 576
Default

I Have a client like that. He drove my writer mad so in the end we told him to write his own material. His excuse was he didn't like the tone!

Even though she revised the tone several times.

Some of them are like that but for 1 of those you can also find 10 amazing clients.

What I would do is ditch the client after this article as its not worth the hassle.

kind regards


sam
X
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2013, 04:28 AM
anng's Avatar
WAHM Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 3,645
Default

Sometimes, it's easier just to walk away. I had one article returned yesterday. The instructions had been vague to start - "write about this business for the businesses' home page." So I wrote an article about what they offer the client and it was returned saying they'd wanted it written from the business's perspective of what they do - so basically it was changing it all to the first person and that they'd wanted keywords added, even though they were not listed in the original instructions at all. I decided that for the $3 I was getting, it wasn't worth it to me. I'd finished work, so I thought, earlier in the day, and I just wanted to curl up, watch movies with my family, and ignore the snow storm going on outside. So I've let the article time out now and feel good about it.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2013, 06:59 AM
beanandpumpkin's Avatar
WAHM Fanatic
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,809
Default

It can be like that when you work with a brand new client. I do one article for new clients before accepting any other work; that way, they can make sure they like my style and I can make sure that they pay the bill. I'll do a revision, or maybe two, on the first couple of articles, but after that, I'd cut my losses and say, "I think you'd have better results by hiring someone else." You have to consider what your time is worth. If you can do one or two $25 articles in an hour, then you're doing well, but when one $25 article takes you two, three, five hours due to revisions and backtracking, then you're simply not. Remember that the client is buying your time. You need to set what value you want to assign each hour and stick to it. Just think: If he's this much of a PITA with the first article, he'll be just the same with subsequent ones.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2013, 07:12 AM
NYoung's Avatar
Super WAHM
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 201
Default

SO glad to hear I'm not alone in this. This article and client are from a content mill - I'd rather not let it time out for fear of losing my rank and pay rate, so I'll have to get through it. I've worked on two other articles for this client and were both approved, no revisions and perfect rating.

It would be nice if this content mill could perhaps set a limit of maybe 2 or 3 revision requests, so the client has the chance to revise work without just being completely knit picky.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2013, 08:30 AM
anng's Avatar
WAHM Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 3,645
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYoung View Post
SO glad to hear I'm not alone in this. This article and client are from a content mill - I'd rather not let it time out for fear of losing my rank and pay rate, so I'll have to get through it. I've worked on two other articles for this client and were both approved, no revisions and perfect rating.

It would be nice if this content mill could perhaps set a limit of maybe 2 or 3 revision requests, so the client has the chance to revise work without just being completely knit picky.
I does depend on the mill. In my case it was TB and I didn't see anything that said there are penalties for dropping a revision, so I hit that cancel button. That said, I know there are sites that do penalize and that makes it tough.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 09:32 AM
Lumara's Avatar
Super WAHM
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 325
Default

I had a client like that when I was working for Heritage Web Design. As I was building the website, the client asked me to change the font. After I did, he asked me to change to another font, and he just kept asking me to change to different fonts, then it was different colors than the ones he originally said he wanted. I complained to Heritage and they told me to inform the client to save all his revision suggestions until I had finished the first draft, and then after that he could get only one revision that incorporated his suggestions. That made it a lot easier on me.

Then there was the client who kept going into the website and changing things as I was building it, then, unhappy with the changes she made, she complained that I had made those changes, and told me to undo them. Then she would make other changes, not like them, ask me to undo them, and I was just spinning my wheels, unable to move forward to complete her website. I dropped her. Heritage offered to pay me a bonus to continue with her, but I refused. Clients like that aren't worth the aggravation, and it is better to drop them then waste time catering to their unfair demands.
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off