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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2016, 10:07 AM
JoeSpirit's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitnessdad View Post
Lori "limited time." good point. Anytime someone say's that now I laugh and click away.
"Limited Time"

A lot of the comments here seem to be relating to a job offer.

I understand that "limited time" from that point of view is something to be cautious about.

The way I read the first message though it seems the OP suggests an attempt to learn some new skills - got scammed when buying an ebook that wasn't what was described.

"Limited time" is a scarcity tactic used by copywriters when creating a marketing message for a product. It is a valid technique. Yes, it is abused at times (i.e. false scarcity). There are marketers who have no integrity, and will use any means to part you from your money.

But the majority of marketers truly want to help others with their product.

The use of scarcity tactics like "limited time" help the viewer make the buy decision. When it's used by legitimate marketers it truly is valid. As in a special sale where the price will be increasing after a limited time period, or in the case, say, of a counselor who can only work with a certain number of people at a time setting a limited number of openings for her/his services.

Just because there's an element of scarcity doesn't necessarily mean you're looking at a scam.

Last edited by JoeSpirit; 07-09-2016 at 10:09 AM. Reason: Clarification
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2016, 09:57 PM
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what was the ebook you purchased
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2016, 10:03 PM
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Join Date: May 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSpirit View Post
"Limited Time"

A lot of the comments here seem to be relating to a job offer.

I understand that "limited time" from that point of view is something to be cautious about.

The way I read the first message though it seems the OP suggests an attempt to learn some new skills - got scammed when buying an ebook that wasn't what was described.

"Limited time" is a scarcity tactic used by copywriters when creating a marketing message for a product. It is a valid technique. Yes, it is abused at times (i.e. false scarcity). There are marketers who have no integrity, and will use any means to part you from your money.

But the majority of marketers truly want to help others with their product.

The use of scarcity tactics like "limited time" help the viewer make the buy decision. When it's used by legitimate marketers it truly is valid. As in a special sale where the price will be increasing after a limited time period, or in the case, say, of a counselor who can only work with a certain number of people at a time setting a limited number of openings for her/his services.

Just because there's an element of scarcity doesn't necessarily mean you're looking at a scam.
Very valid argument, but I'd argue that the term is more misused than used legitimately. In any case, one can discern the legitimate ones from the shady ones. It's a subjective case-by-case evaluation I'd say. I do admit I should have put in a caveat!
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2016, 07:52 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: From Ohio but spending lots of time in Malaysia.
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Arrow How to Avoid Online Job Scams -- Part 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by PenFlavor View Post
When I first started getting my feet wet doing work online I got scammed right after joining.

I know the word "scam" has a nasty bite into it but there is no other way of putting it. I paid for an ebook but did not get what was expected.

Question is, how do you spot a scam from a mile away?
Hi, my response to your question is a bit long so I'll send it in three parts.

Part 1:

Check FaceBook . . .


See if the job site has a Facebook page and if the posts are current. If they’re several years old the page is not being maintained and probably the job site isn’t being maintained well either.


Note the Company Email Address . . .

Note the company email address. If the company does not have a company domain name in their contact email address, but instead use a free email service (e.g., [email protected] vs. [email protected])–then move on.

It’s easy for scammers to use a free email address, steal your info, and move on to a new address. It’s not so easy with a company domain address because it leaves too much of a data trail.

Hope you find Part 1 helpful!
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2016, 07:56 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: From Ohio but spending lots of time in Malaysia.
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Arrow How to Avoid Online Job Scams -- Part 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by PenFlavor View Post
When I first started getting my feet wet doing work online I got scammed right after joining.

I know the word "scam" has a nasty bite into it but there is no other way of putting it. I paid for an ebook but did not get what was expected.

Question is, how do you spot a scam from a mile away?

Part 2:




Search Strategy . . .

Here’s a trick I use all the time in researching online jobs.

Let’s say I’m looking into a company online called, “Micro Jobs Unlimited” to see if they are a legitimate company. Go to Google and type in “Micro Jobs Unlimited” only make sure you use the quotes! That will force the Google search to look for that exact phrase and not Google descriptions that randomly contain all three words.

Here are examples of how I would search that phrase, typed exactly as I would type them into Google.

“Micro Jobs Unlimited” review

“Micro Jobs Unlimited” scam

“Micro Jobs Unlimited” scam review

“Micro Jobs Unlimited” forum

Those search strings will bring up some good information. But be sure the search result you see is not a review by the company itself but by a third party.

Example of a company written review that you don’t want to read. Look at the address and their domain name will be there.

This is a biased review . . .

http://www.MicroJobsUnlimited.com/ta...limted-review/

A third party unbiased review looks something like this . . .

http://www.OnlineJobReviews.com/tag/...imited-a-scam/

Now keep in mind when you do these searches that there will always be someone complaining about something. If you see a few bad reviews about a company you’re interested in and all the rest are good reviews, I would call it a good job site. But if 90% of the reviews are bad, look elsewhere!!

I’ve looked at job sites that looked great, had a clear message and offer, but when I did my research I discovered 90% of the reviews said they were terrible at paying on time!! Always do your research, it will only take you a little bit of time and can save you a ton of headaches!
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-22-2016, 08:05 AM
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: From Ohio but spending lots of time in Malaysia.
Posts: 5
Arrow How to Avoid Online Job Scams -- Part 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by PenFlavor View Post
When I first started getting my feet wet doing work online I got scammed right after joining.

I know the word "scam" has a nasty bite into it but there is no other way of putting it. I paid for an ebook but did not get what was expected.

Question is, how do you spot a scam from a mile away?

Part 3:


Additional Warnings . . .


A payment is required before you can learn anything about the program or product. The whole push from this scam angle is “trust me,” “pay me,” and we’ll “tell you everything!” It’s the old confidence hustle—they’ll take your money and run. A legitimate company/website will lay out the details of what you’ll be getting for your money, there is no mystery.

You are “Guaranteed” riches or wealth nearly overnight. Just give them your money and they’ll show you how to make $250,000.53 in the next three days! No kidding, I’ve actually seen stuff like that. You’ve probably heard the old saying, “If it seems too good to be true—it is!” If a website promises to teach you how to make a large sum of money, but can’t guarantee the outcome, we’ll, that’s different. It’s when you’re “promised/guaranteed” an outcome that you need to run from.

How the company benefits from your work is unclear. For instance with jobs online, you do a job for someone, they benefit from your skills, and you get paid. It’s very straight forward. If it’s unclear how the company benefits, they may not want you to know how they benefit, and could even be grooming you for identity theft, by slowly massaging information out of you. If the deal is unclear–steer clear!

You are bombarded by confusing words and phrases. The offer seems amazing and great, but you’re left confused about what it’s really all about. They are counting on your confusion to cause you to make a mistake they can take advantage of. Legitimate companies clearly lay out what they are doing in easy to understand terms. There is no confusion.


These three parts are from a long blog post I wrote and thought it would be easier to digest them in three separate posts. The blog post is on this site: Work from Home -

Hope you found the advice helpful!! Regards!
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