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View Full Version : Omg!


lorah
03-07-2012, 11:57 AM
I just got a Canon Rebel X for $50 on eBay! It is a film camera, just what I wanted! Now, I need to know other than the standard 35-80mm lens which is another lens that would be good to own? Also, flash units? Tell me everything! I want to know!


AndrewW
03-07-2012, 12:23 PM
Lens really depends on what you want to do. Telephoto certainly has possibilities for a variety of stuff to pull it in closer such as wildlife and sports. If you are shooting fast moving objects get a lens with a lower F rating. For your flowers you might want to give a macro lens a try.

Congradulations on getting the camera, have some fun with it.

lorah
03-07-2012, 12:27 PM
Thank you Andrew! So what would be a good macro lens for it? I'm interested in close up stuff as well as general barns, headstones etc.


TommyH
03-07-2012, 06:30 PM
Congrats Lorah on the find.

I agree with Andrew, the lens will all be determined by what you want to shoot. Wildlife and sports I would say telephoto 70-200 or 70-300. You can pick up a sigma 70-300 for about 100. For landscapes barns things like that I love my 17-40mm, something close for you would be an 18-55mm. I believe you should have an EF mount on that camera so you could probably find 18-55 for around 100 or so.

Some of the telephoto lens have a macro switch that will allow you to have the added focus range for the close up stuff. You can find a extension tube for macro as well. I picked up a 3 extension tubes for 10 bux on ebay. This will allow you to get closer even with a non-macro lens.

lorah
03-08-2012, 03:14 AM
Thanks Tommy,
I am so crazy excited I can't wait to get it next week. Hubs is going to print out the manual for me at work tonight so I will immerse myself in reading. My next 'goal' will be a digital but I really wanted to start with film. I'm floating on air right now. Thanks again for the help.

AndrewW
03-08-2012, 04:10 AM
Thanks Tommy,
I am so crazy excited I can't wait to get it next week. Hubs is going to print out the manual for me at work tonight so I will immerse myself in reading. My next 'goal' will be a digital but I really wanted to start with film. I'm floating on air right now. Thanks again for the help.

When I got the DSLR I had the manual read before the camera got here.

lorah
03-08-2012, 04:27 AM
And that is exactly what I plan on doing Andrew. I want to at least have some kind of idea about how it works before I get it. I am sending hubs to the store to get me some film as well as batteries. I don't want anything to hinder me from hitting it hard when it arrives! I know I will waste alot of film in the beginning, but it's ok. I just want to start shooting!

TommyH
03-08-2012, 08:24 AM
And that is exactly what I plan on doing Andrew. I want to at least have some kind of idea about how it works before I get it. I am sending hubs to the store to get me some film as well as batteries. I don't want anything to hinder me from hitting it hard when it arrives! I know I will waste alot of film in the beginning, but it's ok. I just want to start shooting!

I started thinking last night, the 35-80mm will be like the 18-55 on a digital with a crop sensor. As film would be considered a full frame. So that should be a good lens to start with for landscapes. You might find your self wanting to go wider for some landscapes. If you do get an EF 18-55 it will still give you that wider range from 18-35.

For film you might want to get a film with a speed of around 400. With digital you can change your ISO (film speed on the fly), with film not till you go through the whole roll. If you start shooting in darker areas you might want to get a higher film speed like 800 or so. Or if its really bright areas maybe lower.

lorah
03-08-2012, 08:27 AM
Thank you Tommy. I'll make a note of that. I have also saved your blog posts and am going back to read. I can't wait til it gets here to put some of this info into practice.

AndrewW
03-08-2012, 09:56 AM
I started thinking last night, the 35-80mm will be like the 18-55 on a digital with a crop sensor. As film would be considered a full frame. So that should be a good lens to start with for landscapes. You might find your self wanting to go wider for some landscapes. If you do get an EF 18-55 it will still give you that wider range from 18-35.

Well, really depends on the sensors size.

2x for 4-thirds sensor.
1.6x for Sony APS-C sensor.
1.5x for APS-C sensor.
1x for full frame sensor.
1x for 35mm film.

rbarrett68
03-08-2012, 09:24 PM
Congrats Lora! I know you'll have loads of fun with that camera!:D

Rhonda

lorah
03-09-2012, 12:40 AM
Thanks Rhonda. The seller has been a gem with all my questions and his description said the camera was in 'perfect' condition. I have read the reviews and they are all really great. I'm really very pleased and could just jump out of my skin, I am so excited. LOL Still kind of in shock that I am actually getting it. I should have it early next week. And the weather is going to be fabulous so I will be outside shooting pics!
I have a question. How long do the batteries last under normal circumstances? I think I need to always keep some in my bag.

TommyH
03-09-2012, 06:41 AM
Batteries will vary especially now they make them better. I could shoot several rolls though without issues. If you use the pop up flash a lot it will drain it quicker and if it is constantly focusing while in auto focus that will drain them quicker as well. I purchased 2 sets of rechargeable batteries and had them both charged using a 15 minute charger prior to leaving. This way if the set in camera died I had a back up with me. You can recharge these a good amount before you start seeing a drop off in performance. Worth the extra cost as they will pay for themselves.

Andrew - I was thinking the 1.6 crop factor as she got a canon so if she upgraded to canon digital that is what they are using currently. Of course that can always change. But the EF lens that she would get for the film would work on the EF digital bodies.

lorah
03-09-2012, 07:59 AM
Thanks Tommy,
This model doesn't have the pop up flash. That is one of the first things I need to get. I am not sure if it is a shoe mount or something different. Rechargable may be the way to go, I will check them both out.

lorah
03-10-2012, 05:55 AM
But the EF lens that she would get for the film would work on the EF digital bodies.

So as long as I stay with the EF mount lenses, they should be interchangeable between my film and digital?

AndrewW
03-10-2012, 06:00 AM
So as long as I stay with the EF mount lenses, they should be interchangeable between my film and digital?

What you need to watch out for is lens designed for a smaller sensor size used on a camera with a larger sensor. For example a four thirds lens doesn't have the same imaging size as a full frame sensor, works fine the other way around. As long as the film camera (which is equivelant to full frame) and the digital use the same mount type no problem.

TommyH
03-10-2012, 07:15 AM
Lorah - Yes any EF lens that you purchase for your film camera will work on the Canon Digital. While shooting with film stay clear of any EF-S lenses. These will only work on the digital cameras from 2003 and up. I don't think there is many EF-S lenses out right now, but when you purchase one just make sure it is not EF-S or if its another brand that it is an EF mount.

I think what Andrew is saying that your current 35mm to 80mm. When it is on your film camera it is a true 35mm-80mm lens. Once you upgrade to a digital Canon like a Rebel, XXD, 7D, it will actually act more like a 56mm-128mm. This is due to the digital sensor which gives a 1.6x crop factor. So to figure out your focal length on a digital camera you take your focal length and times it by 1.6 (this is assuming you stick with Canon and they don't make changes by the time you go digital).

Now if you upgrade to a higher end camera like a 5D, these are full frame digital cameras. They act just like a film camera so focal length would be the same.

So while yes you can use any EF lens you purchase now on both film and digital the focal length will change. This is good and bad. Right now the 35mm you have might be wide enough for landscapes, but once you go digital you will find that it is no longer wide enough, as it becomes a 56mm. This is great b/c if you shoot sports or wildlife once you go digital it will seem like you have extra reach/zoom.

lorah
03-10-2012, 07:54 AM
Thank you both so much. I have no idea what you're talking about, LOL, but I'll get there one day. I just got the manual for the camera so will read it today. Thanks for the info on the EF-S lenses. I will make sure it is a straight EF. Also, I do know that I will stick with Canon when I get a digital. I'd like a Rebel digital as well. It's awesome that I only have to look for a body instead of the whole thing. Those are pricey lil buggers! Thanks again for your help. When I find lenses, I will post about them here to get your input before I buy.

AndrewW
03-10-2012, 11:08 AM
I think what Andrew is saying that your current 35mm to 80mm. When it is on your film camera it is a true 35mm-80mm lens. Once you upgrade to a digital Canon like a Rebel, XXD, 7D, it will actually act more like a 56mm-128mm. This is due to the digital sensor which gives a 1.6x crop factor. So to figure out your focal length on a digital camera you take your focal length and times it by 1.6 (this is assuming you stick with Canon and they don't make changes by the time you go digital).

Nah, we already covered that. Just taking a lens designed for a smaller sensor size and putting it on a camera with a larger sensor isn't a good idea. But this wont be an issue going from 35mm to most digital cameras (short of a medium format or something).

TommyH
03-10-2012, 05:12 PM
Nah, we already covered that. Just taking a lens designed for a smaller sensor size and putting it on a camera with a larger sensor isn't a good idea. But this wont be an issue going from 35mm to most digital cameras (short of a medium format or something).

Not sure I follow on what the problem is. All Canon EF lenses can be used on any sensor size Canon camera with an EF mount. The only thing that changes is the crop factor. I have used the 18-55 kit lens that came with the Rebel series (1.6x sensor) on a 5D which is full frame. No issues at all with that. The lens was designed for the Rebel series as a cheap entry lens.

The only difference now is the EF-S lenses Canon makes. These lenses sit closer to the sensor, so on older film cameras the mirror can hit the lens. This is why you don't want to use these on those cameras.

AndrewW
03-10-2012, 06:56 PM
Not sure I follow on what the problem is. All Canon EF lenses can be used on any sensor size Canon camera with an EF mount. The only thing that changes is the crop factor. I have used the 18-55 kit lens that came with the Rebel series (1.6x sensor) on a 5D which is full frame. No issues at all with that. The lens was designed for the Rebel series as a cheap entry lens.

Wasn't being specific to Canon lenses. Some lenses that are designed for a smaller sensor size are going to lose some when used with a larger sensor.



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