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Old 03-04-2016, 06:48 AM
JLeviticus's Avatar
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Default Where do you draw the line when clients want more?

I struggle with this and am interested in learning when other writers make the decision to speak up. For example, one client has decided that I now need to add additional links to blog posts. Although this probably doesn't seem like a big deal to them, it does take time.

Other times, clients have provided detailed outlines for articles and provided lists of possible industry sources for the first few months. Later, instead of the outline, I received a one or two-word description about a very narrow subject that was difficult to research and no source suggestions. Completing those articles now required many extra hours to conduct research and find sources to interview. In one case, the client wasn't willing to increase the rate, so I dropped that project.

What is your personal breaking point and how successful have you been in getting clients to increase rates?
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:17 AM
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I treat each client 'ask' as a value-add opportunity.

"I am more than happy to conduct that research for you/provide those links for you. My billable rate is ***, thus your cost for providing xyz would be ***. As a valued client, I can offer you a special rate of *** for the requested additional services. Delighted to begin the requested work as soon as my retainer fee of *** is received."

Your time is money and your client is going to benefit from your hard work for years to come (especially if you are crafting evergreen content). Each moment you spend working for free for a client as a billable moment you could be generating revenue from elsewhere. We're freelance writers not doormats; the sooner we start realizing the revenue we're generating for clients, the sooner we'll realize our own worth. If your clients are expecting you to provide services for free, look elsewhere for new clients. Globally, English-speaking writers are a hot commodity. International businesses need expertly crafted English content and are willing to pay for it. Bill for your time accordingly.
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Old 03-05-2016, 05:51 AM
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Thanks, Suzie! I like the wording you use to reply to the requests. I definitely have to do a better job of not letting people take advantage of me. As I was turned down, the only time I requested additional compensation, I have been a little reluctant to try it again. I know that it not only hurts me, but all writers, when clients just get away with requiring more work with no additional compensation.
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Old 03-06-2016, 06:56 PM
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It depends on the client. Generally, my clients are long term. So, we talk in advance about their expectations and mine. I will edit as needed, but I do draw the line if needed. Yet, like I said...it's really client by client basis. I've hardly ever had to put my foot down. I'm really picky about the projects that I take. If I get the general idea that the potential client is a pain in the butt, I just won't work with them. I'm too old and cranky for games.
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