Go Back   WAHM Forums - WAHM.com > >

Welcome to the WAHM Forums - WAHM.com.

Welcome to WAHM Forums

Already registered? Login above 

OR

To take advantage of all the site's features, become a member of the largest community of Work-At-Home Moms.

The advertising to the left will not show if you are a registered user.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 05-02-2014, 06:14 PM
ErinHill226's Avatar
Awesome WAHM
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Upstate, South Carolina
Posts: 854
Angry Non Paying Client - How to Report

Hi all!

I haven't been here in a really long time. I slowed down with writing for a bit after having our third child, and now we have a fourth as of two months ago. So, I was writing here and there for existing clients and picking up the random article, but I haven't tried to progress my career in any substantial way as of yet.

ANYWAY...

I have a client I did some writing for awhile back, and he has not paid. I've tried and tried to contact him and he's just not going to and hasn't even responded.

Since I have a contract, screenshots of the work and of our emails showing he intended to pay, that I sent him the work on X date, etc... Can I report something like this to Google and/or his web host? I know you can if somebody straight up steals your work from an existing website without permission, but what about in this case? My content IS on his site. I have checked. It's about ten pages worth.

This was the second project I did for this company and the first time they paid no problem. Then they just vanished. It's not a HUGE amount of money, so actually taking him to court would be pointless. And I'm not hurting for the dough, since my hubby is the main breadwinner. But it's the principle of the thing. I did the work, he should pay up or stop benefiting from my work.

Ideas on anything else I can do?
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 06:42 AM
Yuliya Mironova's Avatar
WAHM Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Saint Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 4,790
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErinHill226 View Post
I have a client I did some writing for awhile back, and he has not paid.
There will always be some of these, if you start work before you've been paid.

For every single product and service I've ever bought online, I've had to pay in advance.

Why are you treating your own professional services differently from that?

Stop worrying about losing customers by insisting on pre-payment. The only people you'll lose are the ones like the one you describe above, and you're better off without them. If you treat your own business professionally, others will also treat you professionally. Just include in your terms of service that you work for pre-payment in full. Only. This is normal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErinHill226 View Post
This was the second project I did for this company and the first time they paid no problem.
That isn't a reason to work for them again before they've paid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErinHill226 View Post
Ideas on anything else I can do?
Yes - if they haven't paid, you own that content, not them. You can serve a DMCA site take-down notice on their hosting company (it's very easy - Google it!). That will resolve it very quickly, one way or another.

Last edited by Yuliya Mironova; 05-03-2014 at 06:45 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 07:17 AM
~Rio's Avatar
WAHM Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 19
Default

Hi Erin,

Yuliya has made some really smart points about preventing content theft.

As for sending the DMCA, you'd be perfectly within your rights to do so. According to https://www.dmca.com/FAQ/What-is-a-DMCA-Takedown:

"In other words the fact the content is yours ... is enough to request a takedown and for the website owner and ISP to comply"

First you should send the the client an official DMCA notice. This links shows what you need to include:
Sending a DMCA Takedown Notice - Digital Millennium Copyright Act Information Site

The client will probably take the content down once you put it in such serious terms, and that will be the end of that.

If you don't get a timely response, you should then send the DMCA takedown notice to the client's web host. Most hosts will have a page set up for you to easily do this - here is HostGator's, for example: DMCA Notices - HostGator

You can find the website's host by doing a WHOIS lookup or going to Web Hosting Search Tool, Reviews & More at WhoIsHostingThis.com.

Google also has a notice of infringement that you can fill out. This may help you get the pages hosting the stolen content de-indexed in the meantime, while you wait for the client's host to take it down:
https://www.google.com/webmasters/to...-notice?pli=1&

Good luck!

Rio
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 11:51 AM
ErinHill226's Avatar
Awesome WAHM
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Upstate, South Carolina
Posts: 854
Default

Most copywriters I know, and according to every book on copywriting and business law I've ever read, you should charge up front only if the project is worth above a certain amount (although that amount is set by each individual writer). I've also not paid for a SERVICE up front plenty of times.

For larger jobs, I do require an up front fee and then the work is broken up into portions, and I get another payment after each portion. This seems to be pretty standard among other copywriters I know, since it also ensures the client doesn't get screwed either. For all the client knows, I could flake out, miss deadlines, require numerous edits, etc...

Also... if you wrote an article for a magazine and things of that nature, you don't get paid up front for that either. They don't have to pay for usually 30 days or more. So I can see why even some GOOD clients would be hesitant to pay up front entirely. Although, I will consider trying it to see what happens, since I'm not overly worried about missing out on work right now. My income is now more for ****s and giggles. I just don't necessarily think it is the only "normal" way to go.


Anyway... thanks for the advice. I was just letting you know I've made this decision after consideration, and obviously non payment is a risk. This job was extremely small. Less than a day of work (each of the ten pages was a product advertisement type deal), so I didn't charge up front for that reason. Maybe in the future I'll consider changing that policy. Although in six years of copywriting, I've had only two clients who failed to pay.

Thanks Rio, for the links. I am going to check them all out. I don't know if I expect any money, and at this point I've let that aspect of it go... but I would like him to know that I'm not going to lie down and let him ignore me. Petty as that may sound.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 01:16 PM
bloggergal's Avatar
Super WAHM
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 481
Default

It is interesting to see the different perspectives on this issue. I never charged a full fee up front, either, but I did work with a contract, and would require a deposit on large jobs.

It all boils down to personal choice.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 01:42 PM
~Rio's Avatar
WAHM Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggergal View Post
It is interesting to see the different perspectives on this issue. I never charged a full fee up front, either, but I did work with a contract, and would require a deposit on large jobs.

It all boils down to personal choice.
This is very true. The 50/50 method, I think, is quite standard among freelancers and is what I prefer to use in my own contracts. Requiring some kind of upfront payment separates the serious clients from the potentially flaky ones.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-03-2014, 03:59 PM
beanandpumpkin's Avatar
WAHM Fanatic
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,809
Default

I generally charge clients who want a lot of work done up front. So far, I have had exactly one client balk, and I've worked with a lot of clients. I have a few regulars who I don't mind billing at the end of the month (after work is done). They live locally and for all they know, I will show up at their businesses if they don't pay, so I feel like it's a small risk. Newbie clients, however, I will do about $50 or, at most, $100 worth of work without getting the full fee in advance.

As far as collecting payment, I'd send a letter return receipt, saying that it would be in their best interest to pay you immediately. I had to do this with a magazine that owed me over $1,000 and was meeting my inquiries with excuse after excuse. I took Angela Hoy's advice: 10 WAYS TO MAKE DEADBEATS PAY UP...FAST! By Angela Hoy, WritersWeekly.com. Within 10 days, I had my payment in full.

Good luck!!
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off