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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2013, 05:39 AM
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I have the same problem with people assuming that if you work at home you don't have a real job. That is bull! And you know what? With a brick-and-mortar job when you are home from work you generally can't work. Period. But when I'm "home" from work, my office is still staring me right in the face, which means I feel like I should be working pretty much whenever I'm not. In that respect, I long for a brick and mortar job some days.

In all actuality though, the drawbacks of working as a freelance writer are not enough to actually make me leave the house to go get a job. I do get sick of my family acting like I never have any money because I don't "work." I'm really not sure how they think I'm paying my bills and feeding myself, but last time I checked I was doing that by working in freelance writing. If I could afford to, I would go sit in Starbucks 8 hours a day 5 days a week and then, since I'd be leaving the house, maybe my family would think I have a real job.
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2013, 06:45 AM
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Default That's what it's all about!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3cows View Post
I left a 20 year professional sales career to freelance and farm, and I have never been happier. The sales job paid very well, but it was highly competitive and I was on call 24/7/365. My family used to laugh about having to find high spots for good cell reception when we went camping at the lake, so that mom could negotiate contracts and return calls.
Although I am just getting started here compared to all of you, I have already seen the benefits of DO's, multiple eggs in the basket and achieving higher levels. So I am busting my butt to work my way up the food chain and reduce my ten hour work day to 6.
My husband and kids are totally on board, but some of the extended family think I must have "failed" somehow in my last career to be doing this now. As I sit here in jeans and tennis shoes with my cell phone turned off, drinking my coffee and looking out at a green pasture with a brand new baby calf cavorting around, I don't feel like I am missing out on anything and I sure don't feel like a failure.
Although I'm pretty new at this too (less than a year in) I'm with you...I don't miss having to fill in for coworkers who were out sick or having to work a crazy schedule because the company refused to hire enough people. I'm struggling to get into a good routine since my 18 month old is way more demanding than she was when I started, but I know it'll smooth out and it's all worth it to be able to stop what I'm doing and take the little sweetie out in the back yard to pick flowers or chase the dogs 'just because we can'.

Finally sorting myself out with a proper office in the spare/junk room and can't wait! WAHM is like an adventure...you never know what you'll be doing from one week to the next, and that's what I like best!
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2013, 07:31 AM
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I think when I first started out, my mother was the only person who acknowledged that I had a "real job"...and even then, I think she was just really excited that I'd found a way to make money from home. But no one else really got it. My husband thought it was a good hobby for me and a nice way to have a little spending money, but not much else. No one else respected it as a job. Not, that is, until my husband lost his job 1 1/2 years ago and we have somehow, miraculously, been able to hold on to our house. Now, we've struggled a lot...won't deny that. I had a rough bought with my health several months ago and wasn't able to work the way I needed to. We had to sell some things to make up for the times I wasn't able to work. But we've held on and it certainly hasn't been because anyone else is paying our bills for us.

I compare it with my mom's flower shop. She goes in to work, talks to people who are looking for a flower arrangement or gift, gets an idea of what they are looking for, and then custom makes the arrangement for that person. It would not be any less of a job for her if she was doing it out of the basement of her house. She puts in a lot of hours and even more creativity and effort providing a service for people, for which she gets paid.

Freelance writing is the SAME THING. People come to us, give us an idea of what they are looking for, and then pay us to custom-create a product for them. Just because our product is digital more often than not does not mean that it is any less valuable. And it certainly doesn't mean that we don't work hard to provide it. I work more hours than most of my brick & mortar friends, simply because it's here with me all the time and it's what I have to do.

I think that it is more a matter of owning your own business and/or being your own boss that people take issue with. Going back to my mom, many people in our family often think that she ought to be able to just drop what she's doing at work to do favors for them because she doesn't have a "real job" with a "real boss." Yes, even though she pays a mortgage on a physical location and works ridiculous hours, people still have a hard time respecting what she does as a real job simply because she doesn't have a "boss" to answer to. But what people don't realize is that, while we don't have a boss in the traditional sense of the word, we do have people to answer to: our clients. In some ways, it's like having many bosses. If you don't keep them happy, you don't keep that job.

Whether it's jealously, ignorance, or something else entirely, some people will just never get it. I've learned over the years to not let it bother me so much. I know the value of what I do and now, because of circumstances, so do the closest members of my family. If someone else wants to judge me or label me as someone who just goofs off on the Internet all day, it's no skin off my nose. My "hobby" has allowed me to hold my family together through what has been the most challenging financial period of our lives. It has given us at least some sense of security in the face of unemployment. Would those same people who judge us for not having a "real job" be able to say the same if they lost their B&M jobs? Didn't think so.
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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 12:34 AM
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Well I used to get this all the time especially from my Dad. He shut up once he realised this fake job was paying the bills and covering holidays, eating out etc.

It does help having a cousin in the biz though as you have that extra level of understanding from another family member.

I love the dinner parties myself when the local snobs ask what we do and I go silent and leave it to the hubby to explain all. We live in an area that the only brits are the retired ones so we stand out being of working age. There is a competition at my tennis club and at 31 I am too young to take part. And there is only 5% members that are under the age of 45.
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 11:03 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 68
Thumbs up I am inspired

For a beginning freelance writer who is just getting her foot off the ground, slightly lol, I am inspired by these posts.

Right now, I write for fun I am a full time RN in a busy labor and delivery unit, a wife, and a mother of 2 young boys. I find a little bit of a "Stress relief" by drinking a cup of coffee with my computer in front of me after a long night on the floor running around.

As for the ease of this job, it's not easy to do a lot of research and such.

I WISH I could make more doing this kind of job, but I know that only takes even more time and work.

I hope to one day be in the shoes of all of you to put this as a REAL job a REAL side job for extra income so I can be home more with my babies.

Congrats to all of you who have made it happen

PM me any tips lol ;-)
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 12:12 PM
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I think most people think it's either a hobby or straight up magic. Those who think it's a hobby aren't going to take it seriously no matter what you say. If you aren't in an out-of-home office, they don't see it as a job.

Then there are those who see it as magic. They don't understand that there is actual work involved- they hear that you make money from home, and they think you're doing some kind of tricks to keep money coming in like those "internet cash machine" ebooks. I've had several people like that want to know my "secret." When I explain it to them, they're always taken aback and are no longer interested. One person actually said to me, "that sounds like a hassle."
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 01:24 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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Smile Haha!

What a great thread! Thanks for making me laugh! Loved the video.

It is so frustrating when people can't wrap their heads around freelancing and working from home. Oh well...they can slave away at a 9-5 job with a long commute...power to'em!
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 03:02 PM
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When I first started working as a freelancer, I found I was just a bit defensive if people didn't understand what I did. I felt a need to explain (or justify) it, but now I just don't bother. I think people are judgmental or skeptical of things they aren't familiar with and instead of asking questions or trying to understand, they go to judgment.

I was at a dinner the other night and was sitting with a group that I don't know super well. We were talking work and one of the women turned to me and said, "What do you do?" I told her I am a freelance copywriter and that I write websites, marketing materials, etc. Two of the other women nodded as if they understood and approved (not that I need their approval, LOL) but this woman looked aghast. She said, "And you make LIVING doing THAT?!!"

I think I would have felt defensive in the past, but this time, I just raised my eyebrows as if I had a great secret and said "oh yes, I do.." and left it at that. It kind of bugged me (was a somewhat rude question) but I was more amused, I think. She has worked for the state since she was 19 (and is around 50 now) and that's all she knows.. a very traditional workplace. I think it just blew her mind that you can actually make a living in a nontraditional setting..
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2013, 03:03 PM
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Ditto that....Mo' Power! LOL!
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 04-24-2013, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreelanceDeb View Post
When I first started working as a freelancer, I found I was just a bit defensive if people didn't understand what I did. I felt a need to explain (or justify) it, but now I just don't bother. I think people are judgmental or skeptical of things they aren't familiar with and instead of asking questions or trying to understand, they go to judgment.

I was at a dinner the other night and was sitting with a group that I don't know super well. We were talking work and one of the women turned to me and said, "What do you do?" I told her I am a freelance copywriter and that I write websites, marketing materials, etc. Two of the other women nodded as if they understood and approved (not that I need their approval, LOL) but this woman looked aghast. She said, "And you make LIVING doing THAT?!!"

I think I would have felt defensive in the past, but this time, I just raised my eyebrows as if I had a great secret and said "oh yes, I do.." and left it at that. It kind of bugged me (was a somewhat rude question) but I was more amused, I think. She has worked for the state since she was 19 (and is around 50 now) and that's all she knows.. a very traditional workplace. I think it just blew her mind that you can actually make a living in a nontraditional setting..
I must admit I used to be offended by comments like this once but now I don't really care. I work very hard but its worth it to be able to drop things at a moments notice to be able to go and play tennis with my husband or to the cinema etc.

Though the hubby always looks suicidal whenever I make him work on a weekend!!!
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