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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2012, 05:26 AM
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Default online teaching options

Hi, all! Anyone still looking for some extra hours can try this website:

tutorabc.com

I have been with these guys for 2+ years, and while it's not a perfect system, it's a good company, VERY big (more than 2 million clients) and I've never had a problem with my pay at all. I get paid promptly on the 10th of every month (unless it's a Sunday, then the 11th of course). There's very little prep work involved - just log in and teach the lesson they have prepared for the student(s). Groups of 1-6 people, working adults. Mostly they are considerate and grateful for the opportunity to speak with native speakers, but a few can get cranky, so you may have to deal with negative feedback from students, but I have always had very positive response from the company when I get negative feedback (which can affect your pay) - they are usually willing to remove the occasional bad grade, as long as it doesn't happen too often, you understand. I have gotten maybe 3 or 4 in the past 2 years, and they've always been removed, so I am paid appropriately for that class.

Base pay is $8.50 per 45-minute session, plus bonuses based on student feedback.

If interested, check it out. (note: it is a video conference and you are expected to be professionally dressed, etc.)

You can be paid via paypal or bank transfer. My bank charges me $15 for international wire transfer, and paypal charges something like 4%, but overall, not a bad deal.

If interested, check it out!
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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2012, 08:08 PM
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I'm really surprised to see the negative posts about Carrot English. I've been working with them full-time for over a year and a half, and I love it!

Due to my family circumstances and transportation limitations, I really wanted a job that I could do solely from home. I am so lucky to have one! To be honest, so many of my friends are jealous of what I do because I have no commute and am home with my family all the time.

My students are Korean business people and middle or high school students. I love my students!!!! They always make me laugh and are so awesome to work with. They always tell me interesting things about their days and are so delighted when I learn something about their culture!

Carrot English gives me textbooks to use with each student, so I don't have to do as much preparation as I did with the previous teaching company I worked with. The books are easy to use in the class, too.

My manager is the best. She's in the US, like me, and always answers all my questions whenever I need help with anything. When we had the initial training when I was first hired, she explained everything in detail, so I felt really prepared for the classes.

I think what I like best about working with Carrot English, aside from my darling students, is that it's reliable. There's always a lot of students in my schedule! I don't have to seek out students, design curriculum, or anything like that. I get paid every month without delay and even get raises twice a year. And the starting rate is much higher than Tutor ABC!

I don't know about the previous posters' experiences with Carrot English, but it's nothing like mine has been. This has been the best job I've ever had. I joined this forum because I want to share my experience with Carrot English. I'd be happy to answer any questions!

Last edited by tutor; 03-12-2012 at 08:11 PM.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2012, 07:02 PM
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Default Questions about Carrot English: for "Tutor"

Hi. I was curious about Carrot English and have seen several posts on Craigslist for their online tutoring. I did read some of the negative feedback on this company and some positive. I'm just wondering if you have to be ESL certified to qualify or is a Bachelor of Arts English sufficient? (they do not specify in ad) Also, where in the US are you interviewed and trained or is it all online? Appreciate any insights or info you can give. Thanks!
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:12 AM
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Hi Emmi,

It's my pleasure to answer your questions. I live in the US and work in recruiting new teachers, as well as managing existing teachers for Carrot English.

A Bachelor of Arts in English is sufficient. TEFL or CELTA certification is preferred, but it is not mandatory.

I train new teachers online via Skype.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly. Thanks!

Veronica
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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2012, 10:37 AM
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Hi Veronica! Thanks so much for your reply to my questions. Just one more please: do you suggest that I apply through the ad on Craigslist (it is from last week) or is there a more direct avenue to apply? I do appreciate your time. Thanks.
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2012, 12:46 PM
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Hi Emmi,

Please send me a message here and I'll give you my email address where you can contact me directly.

Thanks for asking!
Veronica
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2012, 09:44 PM
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I just posted about my experience at TutorABC, and I think they are very low paying, never have any classes to actually schedule you for, and they charge you to get paid by paypal or your bank. Again, many schools don't do these things, and the pay is MUCH better. Russian schools are the way to go! If anyone is looking for a job with a Russian school, message me and I have a lead for you.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2013, 04:17 AM
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Default Carrot English

The Online English thing is pretty routine. A company in Korea patches students to you through an IP phone you plug into your broadband box. There's a 13 hr time difference between SK and the East coast of the U.S. so you have to wake up around 4:30 or 5:30 Am to teach.

The students speak a form of English known as "konglish" that sounds pretty ridiculous to a native speaker. If you correct their grammar and vocabulary, you can end up in an argument. It's not worth it. Other students are drunk during lessons and rush through them or won't say much.Their companies pay for these classes -- not the students. The students participate in company English programs to get promotions or to make small talk with a "a foreigner." Not because they're interested in really learning.

If they opt for casual conversation, be careful. They'll bombard you with dumb questions about the U.S. that are often racist and anti-semitic. The men are very condescending and sexist and shocked by western femininity.

It's a gig that will wear you down after a few months. Teaching without teaching. Women who speak in a monotone and men grunting and groaning in your ear. The instructional content that they give you is pretty bad. "It's raining cats and dogs."

These schools in Korea like to advertise that they pay by the hour, but they really tend to pay about $2 per class and the schedules they give you can be pretty sparse. Good luck!

Last edited by ESL Guy; 03-21-2013 at 04:41 AM.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 03-21-2013, 04:21 PM
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ESL Guy, I'm sorry you've had that experience. I taught Korean kids (from elementary to high school) for about 3 months (not with Carrot English) and I left only because I decided teaching kids was not for me. But I didn't find them to be how you describe. I found them to be hard-working and delightful, for the most part. Some of the kids had a hard time keeping focused, but that's because they were kids :-).

I'm wondering what other people have experienced.

Djuna
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 07-13-2013, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: Questions about Carrot English

Hi to those of you who've asked about Carrot English. The name itself put me off initially Ė they couldnít be serious, and the "getting started" part had a bit of a learning curve to it. But, I've been with them for almost four years now and have never had a payment glitch - ever. Communication is excellent between both HQ in Korea and my US based manager. She's been my advocate with HQ and is always available (Iíve tested that to the max too Ė calling at 5:00 am when Iíve been sick and calling late at night when Iíve had a question!). She speaks Korean but is a native English speaker (and teacher), is professional, punctual, and steps in to translate when I get things tangled up with HQ. All the teaching materials are provided for you, and their interactive website handles everything you could possibly think of in a clear, concise manner. Your schedule is filled as much or as little as you wish, you pick your own hours (limited by the time difference between countries), your pay status - up to the minute, extra teaching materials, recordings of your lessons, your own teacher's board for students to communicate with you, your manager's board to communicate with other teachers and ask questions, a daily report board where you can ask HQ anything and get a speedy response. Thereís even a suggestions board Ė and they honestly want to know how to help you, and a lot more. The phones and headsets are provided for you - and replaced immediately if there's a problem. You're thoroughly trained, guided and supported. The Korean students are mostly corporate professionals that are either intently serious about their study or casual about it and don't want to use a textbook. You have the freedom to work with them as needed. Meeting the challenge of getting through to a variety of learners is the fun/exciting part of teaching. Being good at it is what makes you successful. The same would be true with any teaching position. (To the person who had the not-so-nice stuff to say about their Korean students Ė itís easy to see why your teaching didnít go so well.) Each student is different and can be philosophical and issue oriented, a strict textbook follower or chatter. Some are grumble bunnies but very few. Most are considerate and appreciative, have high learning standards, and become good friends over time. (I even introduced one couple to each other Ė successfully!) Carrot pays better to start, gives increases twice a year Ė if youíve earned it, gives paid holidays and a paid teacher day off for full-time teachers, and treats you with courtesy and respect. What more can I say. I remember reading this board before I started with the company and almost didnít interview because of some of the negative comments. If youíre interested in the company check the source of the info youíre following. Teachers can be grumble bunnies too!
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