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View Full Version : Best Keyboard for Transcription?


ccariati
08-31-2015, 02:51 PM
I'm setting up my office to do general transcription. I've researched keyboards, ergonomic keyboards, mechanical ergonomic keyboards etc., etc. There is a lot of information out there but I think it's best to "go to the source" and hear from people working in this field. Are you currently using a keyboard that you especially like and helps combat fatique, CTS, RSI? I'd greatly appreciate your feedback.


macdknife
08-31-2015, 07:13 PM
Hi,

I'm not an expert on the subject, still hammering away on my trusty Logitech (lol), but hope these links help in coming to what you're looking for.

The Most Comfortable Ergonomic Keyboard | The Wirecutter (http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/comfortable-ergo-keyboard/)

http://allthingsergo.com/blog/category/reviews/ergonomic-keyboards/

Wanna Type Faster? Meet a Buzzy New Keyboard | Good Sh*t | OZY (http://www.ozy.com/good-sht/wanna-type-faster-meet-a-buzzy-new-keyboard/39015)

Cheers :)

suicideblonde
09-01-2015, 05:54 AM
I have used the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000 for many years now. I also know other transcriptionists who really like this one, and it's affordable if you're like me and can't spend $300+ on a Das mechanical keyboard. :)

Here's a link to it: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/microsoft-natural-ergonomic-keyboard-4000-black/7332059.p?id=1122653022021&skuId=7332059


mully
09-01-2015, 07:07 AM
I'm still pounding away on my trusty Logitech also :). I know many people love the Microsoft 4000, mine is sitting in the box waiting for me to try messing with the space bar issue. Lucky me, I ended up with one that has the sticky space bar issue. When I was using it while I was waiting for my first Logitech to show up, I found that my hands got tired on it. I have small hands and I found the reach the way it is set up tired them. I'll happily stick with my Logitech.

ccariati
09-01-2015, 09:37 AM
Thank you for the suggestions. I've checked out all three. The "Buzzy" keyboard would take some getting used to but it's nice to see some designers thinking out of the box!

ccariati
09-01-2015, 09:40 AM
I have used the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000 for many years now. I also know other transcriptionists who really like this one, and it's affordable if you're like me and can't spend $300+ on a Das mechanical keyboard. :)

Here's a link to it: Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 Black B2M-00012 - Best Buy (http://www.bestbuy.com/site/microsoft-natural-ergonomic-keyboard-4000-black/7332059.p?id=1122653022021&skuId=7332059)

The Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000 is a strong contender for me so far. I like the idea of a wired keyboard. I've never been a fan for replacing batteries. I also cannot spend hundreds on a keyboard. I've read good reviews about this one as well. Thanks for the suggestion!

ccariati
09-01-2015, 09:43 AM
I'm still pounding away on my trusty Logitech also :). I know many people love the Microsoft 4000, mine is sitting in the box waiting for me to try messing with the space bar issue. Lucky me, I ended up with one that has the sticky space bar issue. When I was using it while I was waiting for my first Logitech to show up, I found that my hands got tired on it. I have small hands and I found the reach the way it is set up tired them. I'll happily stick with my Logitech.

A problematic space bar is a definite issue and I would not be happy about that either. I've not looked at Logitech as yet but will take a look today. Thanks for the suggestion!

muiy
09-01-2015, 12:49 PM
I bought a a Das Professional 4C mechanical keyboard a month ago (they're only $150) and have been super happy with it. I type faster and the lighter touch required for a keystroke has eliminated all the soreness from my wrists. It also feels more satisfying to type with than a non-mechanical keyboard does.

macdknife
09-01-2015, 07:34 PM
Das is definitely in a class of it's own as far as mechanical keyboards go. The MS-Ergonomic is a strong contender in that category, if one likes an ergo keyboard!!!

DAS has some good deals going on amazon, and so does MS Ergo's. I guess it's a personal choice which keyboard one is most comfortable with. :)

Gutsy
09-02-2015, 01:36 AM
I clicked on this for interest and find myself leaving the post going "I need a better keyboard!" I'm a salesperson's dream!

PeterF
09-04-2015, 02:22 PM
I recently got a new mechanical keyboard for work. I went for a standard QWERTY board instead of trying my luck with any of the bizarre ergo layouts, but here are some thoughts if you want to go in that direction.

First of all, after much deliberation I found that the blue switches were the best fit for me in the context of the Cherry MX lineup. The browns and reds were too sensitive, and I was afraid that the clears, blacks or greens would cause me extra fatigue over time. The blues felt just right, and most of the noise is actually in the keycaps bottoming out, which you can dampen with the o-rings that some sites offer.

I went for a 60% layout, which might be a bit extreme for some people but I would recommend Tenkeyless at the very least, which means it has no dedicated numpad. There are a couple of reasons for this: on a desk, having no numpad on the right side allows me to reduce the transition distance between keyboard and mouse, and also saves me from having to have one or the other uncomfortably off to the side. As an added bonus, a TKL or 60% layout keyboard is wonderful for putting in your lap and typing that way.
I didn't really find a need for a dedicated numpad in transcription, but your specific clients might have different needs so of course you should pick at your discretion. You can also get standalone numpads that you can place somewhere that's not in the way so much.

Just my two cents, hope I helped.

EDIT: Also the keyboard I picked, the Pok3r has fully programmable layers that support 32 character macros. I was able to program mine to have 10 of my placeholder speaker identification lines, hotkeys to skip forward, skip back, play and pause, as well as paste time stamps from ExpressScribe and paste [inaudible] tags, all without having to reach past the main key cluster. These macros are stored in the keyboard's firmware, so you can take them with you to a different computer without having to install any software. This is also a good alternative if you don't have a dedicated foot pedal.

Kolawa
03-16-2016, 12:02 PM
I quite like the Cooler-master Nova-touch TKL because (especially if you use a lot of membrane keyboards) it manages to fell quite premium without feeling weird like when switching to cherry's switches. Just remember to get some new key-caps (I use PBT blanks) and you'll be golden.

PeterF
03-17-2016, 08:18 AM
I quite like the Cooler-master Nova-touch TKL because (especially if you use a lot of membrane keyboards) it manages to fell quite premium without feeling weird like when switching to cherry's switches. Just remember to get some new key-caps (I use PBT blanks) and you'll be golden.

I've seen quite a few people swear by the Topre switch.