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bizymom777
01-25-2012, 03:47 PM
Hello,
I am just wondering if anyone can recommend any online photography courses for beginners? Or if anyone has any book recommendations for someone who is a total novice?

Thanks!


lorah
01-26-2012, 03:32 AM
You might try googling Online Photography Courses and see what you come up with. I have been looking around and I found the New York Institute of Photography. It looks like a thorough course, but I have no clue, really. I am sending for information from several just to see what's out there. I don't know about any books, I haven't been to my local library yet but am going to go. I'd be interested to know what you find, if anything and to hearing others experiences with this. Tommy and Andrew are BEYOND beginners, but maybe they can remember what it was like when they started and what they did :) They are both full of incredible information.

AndrewW
01-26-2012, 04:55 AM
You might try googling Online Photography Courses and see what you come up with. I have been looking around and I found the New York Institute of Photography. It looks like a thorough course, but I have no clue, really. I am sending for information from several just to see what's out there. I don't know about any books, I haven't been to my local library yet but am going to go. I'd be interested to know what you find, if anything and to hearing others experiences with this. Tommy and Andrew are BEYOND beginners, but maybe they can remember what it was like when they started and what they did :) They are both full of incredible information.

I've heard some good things about the New York Institute of Photography but don't have any personal experience with it.

As for me, mostly just learn on my own never did any courses or anything like that.


lorah
01-26-2012, 05:31 AM
I'm looking forward to getting the info from NYIP. See what they have to offer. I am all for learning on your own as well, though. I just need a good place to start. I'm trying to learn the 'vocabulary' right now.

TommyH
01-26-2012, 05:54 AM
I have also learned on my own just from experience, some classes on art during high school (composition, colors, and contrast), and from online reading.

If you go to your local library look for any books from Kodak. Usually a yellow cover, they are always filled with great info. Most of them will be on film but the info translates to digital easily. Any book on art such as composition, colors, contrast, etc. will help out as well. It does not have to be about photography.

As far as things online, I have visited KenRockwell.com: Photography, Cameras and Taking Better Pictures (http://www.kenrockwell.com) there is lots of good info and a beginner section. It's a simple site and very easy to navigate.

Another great place is creativeLIVE | a live, worldwide creative classroom (http://www.creativelive.com/) some of the stuff is more advance at times but there are some basics that come up from time to time. If you attend the live class it is free, so if you are home during the day its really a great place. Some past classes you can watch for free or you have to pay to watch them on your own time.

I have enrolled for the class tomorrow on wedding photography. Even though I try to stay away from this type of work, I take it on once and a while depending on who client is. Also some classes even though its for wedding some things might be useful on other types of photography as well.

I really want to learn more about lighting and I know tomorrows class has some in it, and I always keep an eye out for classes on lighting, landscapes, architecture, etc. Things I mainly shoot.

Finally I am working on my own blog for tips and beginner type stuff as well. My family likes to shoot but they are just starting out so I get questions from them all the time. This way they will have an easy place to go to and read or reference things from me.

AndrewW
01-26-2012, 09:39 AM
I have enrolled for the class tomorrow on wedding photography. Even though I try to stay away from this type of work, I take it on once and a while depending on who client is. Also some classes even though its for wedding some things might be useful on other types of photography as well.


My first time using an SLR camera (Minolta X-700) was at my sisters wedding, they liked my pictures better then the ones the photographer they hired took.

I really want to learn more about lighting and I know tomorrows class has some in it, and I always keep an eye out for classes on lighting, landscapes, architecture, etc. Things I mainly shoot.

Haven't really done much of anything with lightning myself.

bizymom777
01-26-2012, 11:09 AM
Thanks for sharing about how you have learned. I am encouraged to know it is possible to learn on your own. I wonder if anyone has an opinion on Penn Foster's program? Is it worth the money?
Photography Certificate | Penn Foster Career School (http://www.pennfoster.edu/photobasics-cert/)

Thanks!

lorah
01-26-2012, 12:03 PM
I don't know about the Photography program, but I have taken other classes thru Penn Foster and always enjoyed it.

needwrk
01-27-2012, 09:29 AM
I'm looking forward to getting the info from NYIP. See what they have to offer. I am all for learning on your own as well, though. I just need a good place to start. I'm trying to learn the 'vocabulary' right now.

I have done the NYIP couse about 10 years back... i really enjoyed it. They teach you all the basic and advanced techniques.. you have a tutor to help you out with questions there is website and you can go at your own pace.

lorah
01-27-2012, 12:12 PM
The only thing that would stop me is the price. If it is pricey, I may not be able to swing it right now and then I guess I will have to try it on my own.

TommyH
01-27-2012, 01:34 PM
The only thing that would stop me is the price. If it is pricey, I may not be able to swing it right now and then I guess I will have to try it on my own.

The basic camera stuff I found easy, I think it's composition, colors, drawing the eye into the photo and telling the story that is harder to learn/develop.

Photography is really painting with light. If you understand how each setting effects the light hitting the film/sensor, then it comes to practice and shooting.

They way I explained it to my sister was like this. Aperture is like the pupil of you eye. The less light there is the wider your pupil is (smaller f stop), the more light is the smaller your pupil is(higher f stop). The aperture on the camera works the same way, but the numbers are backwards. So when your aperture is set to say F22 it is a small opening, which means less light entering the camera. The smaller the number say F4.0 the aperture is open wider, more light enters.

This also effects your DOP (depth of field, area that's in focus). The smaller your pupil (higher f stop) more is in focus. The wider or more open your pupil is(lower f stop), if you have ever been to the eye doctor and had your eyes dilated you know what I mean, then less is in focus.

Your shutter speed compliments your aperture. If you have a small aperture (f18), you have to have a slow shutter speed to allow enough light to enter the camera for a properly exposed image. This can become a problem for fast moving objects like wildlife, racing, sports, etc. The benefit like above mentioned is more is in focus so landscapes or things not moving, more in the frame will be in focus. Slower shutters you want to have a tripod.

The opposite holds true. If you have a large aperture (f2.8), your shutter has to be faster to allow less light in for a properly exposed image. This is great for action shots where you want to freeze the motion. Or portraits where you want a soft background. Also great if you are holding the camera.

With this kind of basic understanding how one effects the other, you use it to manipulate to other setting to accomplish the effect you are going for. I am going to start my weekly blog next week, starting with the basics I know, images showing how settings effect the photo, etc. So like one week will be aperture setting, then shutter speeds, ISO, etc. If you want send me a PM and I will shoot you the link.

needwrk
01-27-2012, 01:47 PM
I am not sure what they are charging now.. but when I did it I think i paid around $500.. they do have monthly payment option. No harm in trying it out on your own though...There are so many online sources that can help you out in getting started today. There are a lot of forums and websites, just reading through them you get to learn a lot.

lorah
01-28-2012, 03:49 AM
Thanks Tommy! Sent you a PM

As for NYIP, I think I heard or read somewhere that it is upwards of $1000 now. Haven't got the info yet so am just waiting. Thanks!

needwrk
01-28-2012, 09:22 AM
wow! $1000 ! thats too much... I think you can give learning on your own a try ... anyway what concepts you learn you will need to practice it on your own....Also you might want to check out if there are any photo clubs where you live and if your community college has some continuing ed classes in photography. Join some photo forums to ask your question or.. ask here :)

lorah
01-28-2012, 10:26 AM
Everything I need to learn, I have to learn online or go to the library to see if they have a book on it. I live in the sticks and there are no photo clubs, camera stores, community college or anything. I think I will give it a go on my own and see what happens. Tommy is going to start posting to his blog and I have subscribed so I don't miss anything. I'll just do what I can on my own and like you said, I can always come here for critiques and questions! LOL



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