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View Full Version : Carrot English


LuckyThirteen
07-22-2011, 09:02 AM
Does anyone have an experience with the company Carrot English? I had a nice interview and the woman sounded very friendly and on the ball. I have orientation today and was wondering about what to expect.


Tanith
08-02-2011, 10:33 PM
I cannot find much information about Carrot English. Where did you find it? How have things been going with them?

bizilady
08-03-2011, 09:02 AM
I cannot find much information about Carrot English. Where did you find it? How have things been going with them?
I was wondering that myself.


shanstate
08-11-2011, 05:08 PM
Hello, if I were you I would go to the Goeje Teacher's Group on Facebook. They are a bunch of teachers in South Korea and they may know about this organization.

Miss_A
08-12-2011, 06:15 AM
I put in Goeje Teachers but I couldn't find the group. I've googled Carrot English too and not much information comes up.

LuckyThirteen
08-14-2011, 03:36 PM
Hey everyone-

Well, here's my experience. The manager was always super-nice and available. However, i decided not to go with the job. First, you have a phone interview with the manager, then if you pass that you do training on the software they use. Then you have a week of "test sessions" where employees of the company pose as students and you are their tutors. Those sessions are recorded and the manager gives you feedback. You're not paid for any of this training, BTW and it takes 1-2 weeks.

After I did all that and got my feedback, they asked me to do another week's worth of test sessions because I guess they didn't like my first batch and wanted to see if I could improve. I decided not to do that because I felt that not being paid for all of that training with no guarantee of a job was a waste of my time. I didn't feel I could be compatible with their set-up: your sessions are 10 minute phone calls with each student in Korea. They give you and the student reading materials and you have to hit certain quotas (send three corrections on their language via text during each 10 minute call, for example). At the same time, the feedback I got via my test sessions were that I was being too regimented during the call and had to be casual, let the student talk about whatever they wanted, if they didn't want to do the textbook then fine, etc. I just didn't think that my teaching style was right and felt that they were sending too many mixed signals about "always being casual" vs. "hit these quotas" and I couldn't understand the balance they wanted between those things. Also, the 10 minute long sessions were not right for me, I felt very rushed and couldn't get a rapport going with the students in that short amount of time.

So that's my story. :) I'm still hoping to get something online that's audio only, because I do have an ESL degree and am disabled, which makes it hard to work outside the home.

ollalaberry
10-03-2011, 08:25 PM
Hi to all of you!

I completely agree with everything Lucky Thirteen wrote. I also did the "training" only to find that the students didn't answer their phones! So much for training! Also, when I asked the manager about whether or not I would get paid for the time spent training, he didn't answer.. I literally had to ask 5 times before he gave me the answer -- which was NO.

Also, they never gave me an official documents to sign or bank account information until I asked about it a day before my "first real day." I found this to be very unprofessional. Not to mention they didn't have me on the schedule because it was a Korean holiday.. I am supposed to be starting tomorrow (within a few hours) but I am still not on the schedule.

The communication between the manager and I was awful and nothing was ever clear. He didn't show up on the first day of training -- we had to reschedule for another day because he "forgot". I told the manager I was not interested in the position any longer. I lost all of my trust in the credibility of this company. Please take EXTRA caution before submitting your CV or any other important information, as it seems to be a complete scam.

Hope this helps anyone reading!

gladysathome
10-04-2011, 02:37 PM
Try Talkool - they are great! Spicus isn't too bad - but not much teacher support. The absolute best is Open English. They have the best teach support.

English teacher
11-21-2011, 05:20 PM
Does anyone have an experience with the company Carrot English? I had a nice interview and the woman sounded very friendly and on the ball. I have orientation today and was wondering about what to expect.

I workers there for ten months. My canadian managers were uncommunicative, evasive, and eventually dishonest. Thee months out of ten there was a problem with my pay... Either the wrong amount, late, or not delivered at all. One month the accountant decided my pay was too low to be bothered with so they decided without telling me to wait another month and combine. The exchange rate is constantly in flux, and the teacher pays all bank transfer fees so it is impossible to plan on the earned amount.

The teacher works seven weeks without any pay at all so Carrot always has you over a barrel. If he teacher misses a class for any reason, there is a penalty of 6 (yes, SIX!!!) times the lesson fee which is deducted from teachers pay. To resign or quit a full month notice must be given but then the final pay has a lot of deductions removed with no explanation at all, and there is no recourse for the teacher.

the one who does the recruiting from Ontario makes it sound like you work for ANYTIME English, but in fact the two Canadians are powerless and have no control over the chaos in the Korean HQ. The woman in Canada is defensive and full of excuses when approached, and does not respond to problems in a timely manner. Recruiting is done by a couple, and my training was also missed two times because they "forgot".

This company is not professional and they don't respect the teachers such. There are much better organizations that do not exploit native speakers. PASS CARROT on by... You don't need the headaches!

JustATutor
11-22-2011, 12:46 PM
Although it sounds like a disaster from the tutor's perspective, I have to say that the concept of a 10-minute "bite" of English conversation is an interesting one. I might be more motivated to improve some language I'm working on if I knew I could just make a 10-minute phone call when I had a moment. Weird.

englishteacher401
03-04-2012, 05:26 AM
Hi, all! Anyone still looking for some extra hours can try this website:

tutorabc.com

I have been with these guys for 2+ years, and while it's not a perfect system, it's a good company, VERY big (more than 2 million clients) and I've never had a problem with my pay at all. I get paid promptly on the 10th of every month (unless it's a Sunday, then the 11th of course). There's very little prep work involved - just log in and teach the lesson they have prepared for the student(s). Groups of 1-6 people, working adults. Mostly they are considerate and grateful for the opportunity to speak with native speakers, but a few can get cranky, so you may have to deal with negative feedback from students, but I have always had very positive response from the company when I get negative feedback (which can affect your pay) - they are usually willing to remove the occasional bad grade, as long as it doesn't happen too often, you understand. I have gotten maybe 3 or 4 in the past 2 years, and they've always been removed, so I am paid appropriately for that class.

Base pay is $8.50 per 45-minute session, plus bonuses based on student feedback.

If interested, check it out. (note: it is a video conference and you are expected to be professionally dressed, etc.)

You can be paid via paypal or bank transfer. My bank charges me $15 for international wire transfer, and paypal charges something like 4%, but overall, not a bad deal.

If interested, check it out!

tutor
03-12-2012, 08:08 PM
I'm really surprised to see the negative posts about Carrot English. I've been working with them full-time for over a year and a half, and I love it!

Due to my family circumstances and transportation limitations, I really wanted a job that I could do solely from home. I am so lucky to have one! To be honest, so many of my friends are jealous of what I do because I have no commute and am home with my family all the time.

My students are Korean business people and middle or high school students. I love my students!!!! They always make me laugh and are so awesome to work with. They always tell me interesting things about their days and are so delighted when I learn something about their culture!

Carrot English gives me textbooks to use with each student, so I don't have to do as much preparation as I did with the previous teaching company I worked with. The books are easy to use in the class, too.

My manager is the best. She's in the US, like me, and always answers all my questions whenever I need help with anything. When we had the initial training when I was first hired, she explained everything in detail, so I felt really prepared for the classes.

I think what I like best about working with Carrot English, aside from my darling students, is that it's reliable. There's always a lot of students in my schedule! I don't have to seek out students, design curriculum, or anything like that. I get paid every month without delay and even get raises twice a year. And the starting rate is much higher than Tutor ABC!

I don't know about the previous posters' experiences with Carrot English, but it's nothing like mine has been. This has been the best job I've ever had. I joined this forum because I want to share my experience with Carrot English. I'd be happy to answer any questions!

Emmi00
03-16-2012, 07:02 PM
Hi. I was curious about Carrot English and have seen several posts on Craigslist for their online tutoring. I did read some of the negative feedback on this company and some positive. I'm just wondering if you have to be ESL certified to qualify or is a Bachelor of Arts English sufficient? (they do not specify in ad) Also, where in the US are you interviewed and trained or is it all online? Appreciate any insights or info you can give. Thanks! :)

Veronica Carrot English
03-19-2012, 11:12 AM
Hi Emmi,

It's my pleasure to answer your questions. I live in the US and work in recruiting new teachers, as well as managing existing teachers for Carrot English.

A Bachelor of Arts in English is sufficient. TEFL or CELTA certification is preferred, but it is not mandatory.

I train new teachers online via Skype.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly. Thanks!

Veronica

Emmi00
03-20-2012, 10:37 AM
Hi Veronica! Thanks so much for your reply to my questions. Just one more please: do you suggest that I apply through the ad on Craigslist (it is from last week) or is there a more direct avenue to apply? I do appreciate your time. Thanks.

Veronica Carrot English
03-20-2012, 12:46 PM
Hi Emmi,

Please send me a message here and I'll give you my email address where you can contact me directly.

Thanks for asking!
Veronica

Insomniac64
03-21-2012, 09:44 PM
I just posted about my experience at TutorABC, and I think they are very low paying, never have any classes to actually schedule you for, and they charge you to get paid by paypal or your bank. Again, many schools don't do these things, and the pay is MUCH better. Russian schools are the way to go! If anyone is looking for a job with a Russian school, message me and I have a lead for you.

ESL Guy
03-21-2013, 04:17 AM
The Online English thing is pretty routine. A company in Korea patches students to you through an IP phone you plug into your broadband box. There's a 13 hr time difference between SK and the East coast of the U.S. so you have to wake up around 4:30 or 5:30 Am to teach.

The students speak a form of English known as "konglish" that sounds pretty ridiculous to a native speaker. If you correct their grammar and vocabulary, you can end up in an argument. It's not worth it. Other students are drunk during lessons and rush through them or won't say much.Their companies pay for these classes -- not the students. The students participate in company English programs to get promotions or to make small talk with a "a foreigner." Not because they're interested in really learning.

If they opt for casual conversation, be careful. They'll bombard you with dumb questions about the U.S. that are often racist and anti-semitic. The men are very condescending and sexist and shocked by western femininity.

It's a gig that will wear you down after a few months. Teaching without teaching. Women who speak in a monotone and men grunting and groaning in your ear. The instructional content that they give you is pretty bad. "It's raining cats and dogs."

These schools in Korea like to advertise that they pay by the hour, but they really tend to pay about $2 per class and the schedules they give you can be pretty sparse. Good luck!

djunamod
03-21-2013, 04:21 PM
ESL Guy, I'm sorry you've had that experience. I taught Korean kids (from elementary to high school) for about 3 months (not with Carrot English) and I left only because I decided teaching kids was not for me. But I didn't find them to be how you describe. I found them to be hard-working and delightful, for the most part. Some of the kids had a hard time keeping focused, but that's because they were kids :-).

I'm wondering what other people have experienced.

Djuna

Agarretson
07-13-2013, 11:15 AM
Hi to those of you who've asked about Carrot English. The name itself put me off initially – they couldn’t be serious, and the "getting started" part had a bit of a learning curve to it. But, I've been with them for almost four years now and have never had a payment glitch - ever. Communication is excellent between both HQ in Korea and my US based manager. She's been my advocate with HQ and is always available (I’ve tested that to the max too – calling at 5:00 am when I’ve been sick and calling late at night when I’ve had a question!). She speaks Korean but is a native English speaker (and teacher), is professional, punctual, and steps in to translate when I get things tangled up with HQ. All the teaching materials are provided for you, and their interactive website handles everything you could possibly think of in a clear, concise manner. Your schedule is filled as much or as little as you wish, you pick your own hours (limited by the time difference between countries), your pay status - up to the minute, extra teaching materials, recordings of your lessons, your own teacher's board for students to communicate with you, your manager's board to communicate with other teachers and ask questions, a daily report board where you can ask HQ anything and get a speedy response. There’s even a suggestions board – and they honestly want to know how to help you, and a lot more. The phones and headsets are provided for you - and replaced immediately if there's a problem. You're thoroughly trained, guided and supported. The Korean students are mostly corporate professionals that are either intently serious about their study or casual about it and don't want to use a textbook. You have the freedom to work with them as needed. Meeting the challenge of getting through to a variety of learners is the fun/exciting part of teaching. Being good at it is what makes you successful. The same would be true with any teaching position. (To the person who had the not-so-nice stuff to say about their Korean students – it’s easy to see why your teaching didn’t go so well.) Each student is different and can be philosophical and issue oriented, a strict textbook follower or chatter. Some are grumble bunnies but very few. Most are considerate and appreciative, have high learning standards, and become good friends over time. (I even introduced one couple to each other – successfully!) Carrot pays better to start, gives increases twice a year – if you’ve earned it, gives paid holidays and a paid teacher day off for full-time teachers, and treats you with courtesy and respect. What more can I say. I remember reading this board before I started with the company and almost didn’t interview because of some of the negative comments. If you’re interested in the company check the source of the info you’re following. Teachers can be grumble bunnies too!

Tashina Tucker
08-06-2013, 09:11 AM
Hi. I was curious about Carrot English and have seen several posts on Craigslist for their online tutoring. I did read some of the negative feedback on this company and some positive. I'm just wondering if you have to be ESL certified to qualify or is a Bachelor of Arts English sufficient? (they do not specify in ad) Also, where in the US are you interviewed and trained or is it all online? Appreciate any insights or info you can give. Thanks! :)
I'd like some more information on tutoring with Carrot English.

Tashina Tucker
08-06-2013, 09:12 AM
Hi Emmi,

Please send me a message here and I'll give you my email address where you can contact me directly.

Thanks for asking!
Veronica
How do I get into one-on-one contact with about Carrot English?